img

Orthodox Jewish Chamber of Commerce joins CM Menin’s bill supporting NYC businesses by eliminating red tape and certain penalties


The Orthodox Jewish Chamber of Commerce's decision to join CM Menin's legislative Intro 845 bill is a significant step towards supporting the many New York City businesses that have been negatively impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic. This bill aims to eliminate red tape, reduce certain penalties, institute first-time warnings, and establish new cure periods, all of which will help ease the burden on struggling businesses.
 
In a time when small businesses are facing unprecedented challenges, it is essential to provide them with the support they need to survive and thrive. The Orthodox Jewish Chamber of Commerce recognizes this need and has chosen to align themselves with CM Menin's bill as a way to contribute towards the revitalization of New York City's business community.
 
Mayor Adams's "Small Business Forward" Executive Order 2 has already identified 118 reforms that can save NYC small businesses approximately $8.9 million annually. These reforms include administrative, policy, and legislative changes that can have a significant impact on the city's small business sector. However, many of these reforms require legislative action to be implemented effectively.
 
Intro. 845 seeks to codify several of the reforms identified in Mayor Adams's executive order, ensuring that they become a permanent fixture in New York City's legislative framework. By doing so, the bill will provide much-needed relief to small businesses and help them recover from the economic hardships caused by the pandemic.
 
In addition to the Orthodox Jewish Chamber of Commerce, several other prominent business organizations have also lent their support to this legislation. These include the NYC Hospitality Alliance, Brooklyn Chambers of Commerce, Bronx Chambers of Commerce, Staten Island Chambers of Commerce, and Queens Chambers of Commerce. The widespread backing of this bill by various business groups demonstrates its importance and viability in addressing the challenges faced by NYC businesses.
 
The specific measures outlined in Intro. 845 are designed to alleviate the burdensome regulations and penalties that many businesses face. By eliminating unnecessary red tape, the bill aims to streamline bureaucratic processes, allowing businesses to operate more efficiently. This will not only save time and resources but also provide businesses with greater flexibility to adapt to the changing business landscape.
 
Furthermore, the bill proposes reducing certain penalties and instituting first-time warnings for regulatory violations. This approach recognizes that businesses may inadvertently commit infractions due to the complexity of regulations and the unique circumstances of the pandemic. By offering first-time warnings instead of immediate penalties, the legislation emphasizes a more constructive and understanding approach that will encourage compliance and support the growth of businesses.
 
Additionally, the establishment of new cure periods is a crucial component of the bill. Cure periods provide businesses with a designated period to rectify and resolve any violations or non-compliance issues. This allows businesses to address problems promptly without facing immediate penalties or negative consequences. The introduction of cure periods recognizes the fact that businesses require a fair chance to rectify mistakes and improve their operations without facing harsh penalties that could potentially cripple their recovery efforts.
 
In conclusion, the Orthodox Jewish Chamber of Commerce's decision to support CM Menin's legislative Intro. 845 bill is commendable. This legislation, which aims to eliminate red tape, reduce penalties, institute first-time warnings, and establish new cure periods, is essential in addressing the challenges faced by NYC businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic. By codifying several of the reforms identified in Mayor Adams's executive order, this bill will provide much-needed relief and support to struggling businesses, ultimately aiding in the revitalization of New York City's economy.